Create Change

http://www.createchange.org/cases/expanding.shtml

Expanding access

Journal articles, once available only to subscribers and “authorized users,” increasingly are becoming freely available on the web.

Journal articles, once available only to subscribers and “authorized users,” increasingly are becoming freely available on the web.

Sometimes they are in open digital archives organized around disciplines or subjects:

Similarly, many digital archives bring together the intellectual capital of institutions. In addition to journal articles (as pre-prints or after undergoing peer review), these “institutional repositories” often contain digital versions of theses and dissertations, working papers, and other digital items generated by any academic institution, such as administrative documents, course notes, or learning materials.

Search engines including Google Scholar, Windows Live Academic, and CiteSeer enable searching of content across many digital archives. The Directory of Open Access Repositories (Open DOAR) allows users to identify open archives — institutional or disciplinary — at any institution. Depositing your work in an open archive maximizes its availability, use, and citation potential.

Open-access journals are another option to extend the availability of your work. These are bringing down barriers to research access and exploring new business models that recover publishing costs through alternatives to subscription or other fees to view articles. Models differ from field to field and journal to journal, but often they rely on publication fees paid from grant funds, advertising revenue, membership fees, institutional cost subvention, or other sustainability strategies.